A few thoughts on learning, responsibility and commitment

Up to recently, I only knew of one meaning of “learning”: that is to take in more knowledge, or to improve one’s existing knowledge.

So it’s mostly about information and knowledge. About what one knows.

But with time and more experience in management, communication and work in general, I realized that there’s another type of learning that is even more important for one to make progress in work and life.

And it’s not quite the above type of learning more knowledge.

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Building a culture of high performance: Learn to give and receive feedback well

There are many things we can learn from the book Netflix’s Culture of reinvention. Among them, a practice that we can all learn and apply is its insistence on “selfless candor”: the practice of improving performance through receiving regular feedback (from everyone).

To build a culture that really embraces constant learning and improvements, learning to give and receive feedback well is a sine qua non.

Without constant 360-degree feedback, we identify our mistakes more slowly (and sometimes completely oblivious to our mistakes) and as a result, we learn and improve more slowly.

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Lessons from Netflix’s culture of reinvention

The new book about Netflix’s culture of reinvention is superb, in my opinions. Its full title is: “No Rules Rules: Netflix and the Culture of Reinvention” by Reed Hastings (CEO) and Erin Meyer.

The book shares how Netflix has built a culture of reinvention, whereby making it one of the leaders in the creative business.

This book contains many things that are, well, to use Netflix’s lingo, “stunning”.

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Lessons from “Multipliers” – How the best leaders make everyone smarter

Below are some of my learning points from the book “Multipliers: How the best leaders make everyone smarter” by Lize Wiseman.

In the book Wiseman introduces 2 types of leaders: Multipliers and Diminishers. As the names suggest, Multipliers are leaders who can “multiply” the smartness of the organization they manage, while Diminishers do the reverse.

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Building a company’s culture – Lessons from “What do you is who you are”

I recently just read Ben Horowitz’s 2nd book: What you do is who you are: How to create your business culture.

This post is written as my study notes to understand and apply what’s suggested in this book. So these notes shouldn’t be taken as a literal summary of Ben’s book, but my interpretations of his, as I learn.

Now, let’s get started.

It’s more effective to make your culture explicit

Culture is a set of shared values. Shared by all of the staff in a company.

As the leader, if you don’t make them explicit, your employees wouldn’t know them all.

And more insidiously, each will understand the company’s culture in a different way. And then, they’d act accordingly.

That’s a mess.

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