Interesting points from “The best way to learn Math facts”

I recently happened to come across an article on the topic of learning Math facts, titled “Fluency Without Fear: Research Evidence on the Best Ways to Learn Math Facts” by Jo Boaler.

The topic of making Math cool again is, in my opinions, very critical b/c it’s the foundation of all sciences and it should have been cool. The way it’s currently taught and approached makes it uninteresting and scary.

Below are a couple of interesting points I gathered from the above article:

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2 interesting points from Andrew Ng’s interview with Geoffrey Hinton

In this interview in a Coursera course by Andrew Ng with Geoffrey Hinton, who according to Ng is one of the “Godfathers of Deep learning”, I found 2 points that were quite interesting and thought-provoking.

On research direction

When asked about his advice for grad students doing research, Hinton said, at about 30 mins in:

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“Yes, I have”: a story about an encounter with Itzhak Perlman

This is a story about an encounter of a guest with Itzhak Perlman, as told by Matthew Kelly in his book The Rhythm of Life.

The story begins:

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A few ideas on EdTech, from A16z’s podcast

A16z just had a podcast on EdTech, which I think is quite helpful to those of us who are interested in this space.

Here’s the link to the audio.
(Below the audio, you’d also see the transcript, if you’d rather read than listening.)

Below are some interesting points I found from the podcast that can be the seeds for startups ideas:

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Lessons from “Multipliers” – How the best leaders make everyone smarter

Below are some of my learning points from the book “Multipliers: How the best leaders make everyone smarter” by Lize Wiseman.

In the book Wiseman introduces 2 types of leaders: Multipliers and Diminishers. As the names suggest, Multipliers are leaders who can “multiply” the smartness of the organization they manage, while Diminishers do the reverse.

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Building a company’s culture – Lessons from “What do you is who you are”

I recently just read Ben Horowitz’s 2nd book: What you do is who you are: How to create your business culture.

This post is written as my study notes to understand and apply what’s suggested in this book. So these notes shouldn’t be taken as a literal summary of Ben’s book, but my interpretations of his, as I learn.

Now, let’s get started.

It’s more effective to make your culture explicit

Culture is a set of shared values. Shared by all of the staff in a company.

As the leader, if you don’t make them explicit, your employees wouldn’t know them all.

And more insidiously, each will understand the company’s culture in a different way. And then, they’d act accordingly.

That’s a mess.

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